Canadian Vending

Features Business Staffing
A Season of Change


December 3, 2009
By Cam Wood


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Without a doubt, the past several months have been extremely trying for the vending industry. After surviving through a decade of significant change in how we can, and are allowed to do business, we have battled the loss of our market, through plant closures, legislative interference and lifestyle adjustments in the current recession.

Without a doubt, the past several months have been extremely trying for the vending industry. After surviving through a decade of significant change in how we can, and are allowed to do business, we have battled the loss of our market, through plant closures, legislative interference and lifestyle adjustments in the current recession.

The economists have yet to agree on what the next few fiscal quarters will hold for Canada, but regardless, as business people we must prepare to move ahead unabated.

The question is, in this new economy, do we simply follow the same path, or do we resolve in 2010 to make some real change in how we operate?
In this issue of Canadian Vending, we have laid out a number of articles we hope will enable you to plan, prepare and implement real change in your business plan.

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Making a commitment to change is one thing, but planning and developing a system to make it work is another. As author Michael Guld discusses in his feature this month, a resolution is nothing more than agreeing to quit something – whether it’s smoking, procrastinating, or something akin. But real change must come with a targeted strategy, and a healthy dose of soul-searching.

You must ask, if I commit to improving my business plan this year, what are the key indicators of my commitment? On top of that, who are the key players that will help me facilitate that change?

As Jeff Civillico writes in his piece on addressing company challenges, you must also recognize that if you involve other people in remodeling your business plan, are they giving you lip service or a real commitment? If it’s your own personal vision to reinvent the process, how much of an investment will they have to moving it forward with you?

Ask any successful vending operator out there and I’m certain they will say that longevity comes from having a clear understanding of the value of your business and the services you offer. It also relies heavily on partnerships with locations, suppliers and peripheral businesses.

The market has become smaller, and you can bet the people you serve are making some serious resolutions this year.

Will you make the same resolutions; or will you make a commitment to real change?

Happy New Year.


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