Brian Martell

Brian Martell

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Guatemala, in the highlands of Huehuetenango, grows some of the best coffees Mesoamerica has to offer.  Growing along with the coffee is a palpable tension born of economic desperation by families who are losing their grip on their farms. 
Coffee was, is and will always be one of the most affordable luxuries. Regardless of socio-economic standing, it is one of life’s pleasures that some would argue is not necessary to survive (although I’d take exception to that) but in an instant, fills us with warmth and focus simultaneously.
About a decade ago, butter coffee started to surface as a “thing”. The idea was founded in more than just a very rich caloric beverage; the aim was to enhance the well-being of the consumer through an Atkins style regime based on ketosis (limiting carbohydrate intake in favour of fat and proteins).
Old-school coffee roasters have an obsession with their product. This is a good thing: whether it involves the selection of the green, the blending of the beans or coaxing out the finest flavour development in the roasting process – the final proof has always been the taste in the cup.  
Why would you tweet something to the person sitting at the desk right next to you? If you have to ask this question, you are probably not a Millennial. Millennials (also known as Gen Y-ers) are people born in the 1980s and 1990s.
The North American office coffee service (OCS) industry has been rocked by a standard that has had a profound effect on the way we make coffee. Cup by cup in a cartridge has shifted the paradigm of coffee brewing where even the smallest of offices now have choice in what consumers drink.

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