Naomi Szeben

Naomi Szeben

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In a picture postcard setting, the Misty Mountain Farm is set with the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains in the background...and a cashless vending machine that dispenses eggs from its roadside stand. Normally, vending machines are a seen as an urban creation, made for dispensing big-city needs, but as the Poortvliet family found, it has an application for farmers, too.
Today’s vending machines are not just about impulse purchases. Lorna Kane, of Kane’s Distributing has been watching the trends come and go, and noticed that the machines are being used by entrepreneurs who test out their products through automated sales.
In speaking with the vending and convenience service industry’s leaders, I was most impressed with their ingenuity. In this issue you will read about how some vendors met a challenge, or transformed a difficult situation into an opportunity.
Halo Top Creamery launched its new range of snackable bars with just 80-90 calories and only 7-9 grams of sugar per bar, and to celebrate, have teamed up with TripAdvisor to let fans book an ice cream-themed pastel-coloured Airstream Trailer for a limited time.
Vendors and coffee service industries are exploring new ways to reach out to clients, using social media to showcase their industry. Design and innovation catch readers’ eyes and convert them into clients. Consumers are becoming more aware of new technologies and trends to share a gourmet experience.
Balzac’s Coffee Roasters had grown from a small café in Stratford, Ontario into a successful chain within a relatively short stretch of time. It can be a challenge for any company to scale up effectively, but Balzac’s managed to grow into a series of artful spaces that retain local characteristics without using cookie-cutter branding to establish itself as a chain.
With the Canadian Coffee, Tea & Water show coming up, and HostMilano around the corner, operators and distributors are looking at how the HoReCa (Hotel, Restaurant and Catering) industry is dealing with coffee’s growing popularity. Studies by Restaurants Canada and Europe’s Ulisse Information System indicate that people want better quality coffee, and are willing to both pay more, or go an extra distance to satisfy their craving.
Ryan Storey of Huer foods supplies the sweets and snacks for many of Canada’s vending machines. Storey took time out of his busy schedule to share some insights as to what will drive the candy-buyers to machines.
Some of the largest point-of-sale providers in Canada sat down with Canadian Vending and Office Coffee Sales to discuss how cashless vending is evolving. With more consumers using cell phones and making online transactions, we started analyzing the technological trends and asked what the future holds.
The way we’re doing business is changing. When the first unattended, coin-operated vending machine, or “automat” was unveiled in 1880 in England, dispensing postcards, entrepreneurs knew a business opportunity when they saw one.
Travelling can be alternately hectic and boring – it’s all, “hurry up and wait.” A new use for vending machines kills two birds with one stone: It brings an audience to obscure, independent Canadian books that wouldn’t ordinarily be noticed, and provides commuters with brain food instead of junk food. A vending machine was set up in Toronto’s Billy Bishop Airport, to sell Canadian content to book-starved travellers.
Out-of-home coffee segment is growing to meet the needs of an expanding market: In Italy, it is worth over 78 billion euros and is growing at an annual rate of 8 per cent. (source: Censis-Coldiretti.)
Happy New Year to our readers! We have many new things to celebrate this year: First, we are happy to announce there will be four editions of Canadian Vending and Office Coffee Service a year. That’s right, we’re moving from a bi-annual publication to quarterly publications.
Dan Baraniuk has worked as Canada’s longest-running and experienced route man. He looks fondly on his career in vending, which started in 1967. A proud husband to Cathy Baraniuk, the father of five children, and doting grandfather of nine grandchildren shares his experience with Canadian Vending.
This is my first editorial for Canadian Vending and Office Coffee Service Magazine. When I first started editing for this publication, I was a bit daunted. My only exposure to vending machines were the devices that swallowed coins and dispensed treats. In my subsequent months of research and reading terrific articles by reporters like Michelle Brisebois, I realized that today’s vending machines are nothing like the junk food dispensers of my youth.
Known for its Necco wafers, the New England Confectionery Co. (NECCO) plant in Revere, Massachusetts shut down after its recent buyer, Round Hill Investments, LLC, announced it has sold the company to another candy maker.

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