Canadian Vending

Features Business Operations
Grande Prairie Boy Has Grand Dreams

Starts own Vending Business with One Machine


April 30, 2008
By Canadian Vending Staff

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He’s only 11, but David Miller is already working on a plan to expand his business. David’s plan is pretty simple – a single pop machine. But someday soon, he thinks it’s going to turn a nice little profit.

Starts own Vending Business with One Machine

He’s only 11, but David Miller is already working on a plan to expand his business.

David’s plan is pretty simple – a single pop machine. But someday soon, he thinks it’s going to turn a nice little profit.

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“Once it’s paid off I want to put a snack machine beside it and double my profit because if you buy one you might as well buy the other, that’s what I would do,” said David, a Grade 6 student in Grande Prairie, Alta.

David’s career as a businessman started when he received his $400 resource rebate cheque from the provincial government. While most 11-year-olds may have used the money to go towards an X-Box 360 or video games, David wanted to do more.

That chance came when his father, Dave, who works as a manager at local business, mentioned that his company had to remove its pop machine from its office.

“David has always been trying to think of ways to make money and at his age it’s tough to do any labour job, but I remembered the story of an NHL owner who bought a pop machine when he was David’s age and then bought two and so on,” said his dad. “So I just threw it out there and he ran with it.”

With a little guidance from his grandfather, David called vending companies to find out the cost of a machine, surveyed the workers to find out what kinds of pop they like and then created a business plan.

His grandfather helped him find a used machine for $3,000, but the youngster talked down the owner to $2,500.
He gave his $400 cheque to his parents as a deposit and they secured a loan for the rest.

Based on a profit of 60 cents a can, David calculated he could earn $1,500 a year off the machine, pay off his loan in a year and a half and then start turning a profit.

David even attracted the attention of Alberta Premier Ralph Klein, who spoke about his venture during his last official speech May 10 at his premier’s dinner in Edmonton.

His parents both insist David did all the legwork and made all the phone calls without any help from them.
He even called the City of Grande Prairie to find out if he needed a business licence, which he didn’t.

“After a couple minutes (on the phone) I would hear him say ‘No, I’m 11. Yes, 11.’ The conversation would suddenly take a different turn at that point,” his mom, Amber, said with a laugh.

David also collects the empty cans for the deposit refund; even paying his mother for the time she spends taking them in for him.

“My friends all think it’s all cool and that I’m rich and stuff,” said David with a smile.o
SOURCE: Canadian Press


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