Canadian Vending

Features Consumer Behaviour Trends
Innovative drink packaging draws consumers, suggests report


September 23, 2014
By Canadian Vending

Topics

Sept. 23, 2014, Chicago – It makes sense to use innovative
drink packaging to draw consumers to your product, suggests a report from
research firm Euromonitor International.

Sept. 23, 2014, Chicago – It makes sense to use innovative
drink packaging to draw consumers to your product, suggests a report from
research firm Euromonitor International.

Among the different packaging types, metal packaging
represented the largest share (42 per cent) of the total soft drinks packaging,
although its growth continued to stagnate in 2013, said Soft Drinks Packaging in Canada.

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The second largest packaging type is rigid plastic, made up
of mostly polyethylene terephalate (PET) bottles, complemented by high-density
polyethylene (HDPE) and other plastic bottles or jars, representing 37 per cent
of the total market. Plastic experienced a four per cent growth, surpassing
other packaging types.

Liquid carton, glass bottle, paper-based container and
flexible packaging round out pacakaging options, accounting for nine, seven,
three and three per cent, respectively, of the total soft drinks packaging
market, said the report. Each experienced little growth in 2013. The volume
sales from food service typically consist of less than eight per cent of the
total sales.

Going forward, the overall soft drinks packaging market is
projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of one per cent, the
fastest-growing subcategories being fruit/vegetable juice packaging (three per
cent CAGR), sports and energy drinks packaging (three per cent CAGR), and
bottled water packaging (two per cent CAGR) in the forecast period, with some
industry participants suggesting even more optimistic growth rates (for
example, five to six per cent CAGR).

Despite the relatively slow growth in unit volume terms,
many industry participants stress the importance of packaging innovation as a
draw to the actual product. The findings suggest it makes sense to redesign
packaging regularly, and such changes may be even more powerful when combined
with compelling communication and effective consumer education.