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Meals versus snacks tackled in IDDBA report


January 17, 2017
By Canadian Vending

Madison, WI – Baby boomers are the largest snacking demographic, consuming an average of 1,200 ready-to-eat snacks per person annually compared to an average 1,000 snacks eaten by millennials, according to a trend report from the International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association that aims to help food suppliers sort out packaged food product trends.

“Snacking has evolved from merely an incidental eating behavior to a purposeful, rich cultural experience,” the report says.

The report pits meals against snacking in order to reflect consumers’ decision-making process and to help manufacturers and food-service providers sort out the differences.

Meals:

  • Meals have culturally defined rules.
  • Meals have traditionally helped structure the day.
  • With meals, nourishment is provided, relationships are built and decisions are made.
  • Ultimately, meals have a lot of cultural baggage!

Snacks:

  • Snacks are outside the boundaries of meals in a more fluid space where rules can bend and shift.
  • Snacks can be anywhere and anything, and are playing an increasingly diverse role in people’s food lives and food culture.
  • Snacks are not a daypart, and snacking is not a category – but it is a huge opportunity?

How snacking differs from meals:

  • smaller size
  • between times
  • low prep and cleanup

The general view of health and wellness is changing and the IDDBA identifies two elements to that view: fresh, less processed foods, and the “premiumization” of food.

To satisfy a need for fresh, less processed food, vending and OCS operators may want to consider these five factors when choosing products for their machine:

  • clean labelling
  • inherently nutrient dense
  • organic
  • free-from
  • environmental impact

To satisfy a need for premium food, vending and OCS operators may want to consider these five factors when choosing products for their machine:

  • high-quality ingredients
  • sourcing
  • transparency
  • storytelling
  • sustainability

“Shoppers are becoming more health conscious and less price conscious,” the report concludes.

The full report, entitled What’s in Store 2017, is available here.