Canadian Vending

Features Business Staffing
Most Canadians Want Nutritional Snacks

Canadians feel they aren’t getting enough nutrition


February 26, 2008
By Canadian Vending

Topics

A recent Ipsos Reid survey suggests many Canadians feel they aren’t
getting enough nutrition on a daily basis and may be turning to snacks
with multi-nutritional benefits to fill the gap.

nutritionA recent Ipsos Reid survey suggests many Canadians feel they aren’t getting enough nutrition on a daily basis and may be turning to snacks with multi-nutritional benefits to fill the gap.

Healthy eating is top-of-mind with many Canadians, especially since the release of the new Canada’s Food Guide in 2007. However, a recent Ipsos Reid survey reveals that while Canadians say they are looking to supplement their diets with more wholesome foods, they don’t feel they’re able to every day. Canadians appear to want it all from their snacks: nutrition, great taste and convenience.

Two thirds of Canadians (63 per cent) say that when they snack between meals, they are looking for nutritious food choices that are low in fat and calories. Canada’s Food Guide suggests that snacks can keep people energized and provide important nutrients if chosen wisely. This may be why the majority of Canadians (71 per cent) say they are looking for snacks offering multiple nutritional benefits. With so many people coming up short when it comes to their basic nutrition, snacking has become a way to top-up as well as fill-up.

Advertisment

Canadians surveyed by Ipsos Reid also revealed:

  • Forty-six per cent believe that snack foods are usually either healthy or tasty, but not both.
  • Four in 10 (37 per cent) of Canadians claim that they feel guilty when they snack in between meals.
  • The prevailing view (65 per cent) is that snack foods are usually not a good source of nutrients.
  • A quarter (27 per cent) of Canadians are snacking more often than they used to due to time constraints.
  • Nearly 40 per cent are feeling too time-strapped to worry about getting specific nutrients in their everyday diets.

So, how do the provinces compare?

Alberta

  • Seventy-one per cent of Albertans try to select snacks that have multiple nutritional benefits.
  • One third of Albertans (33 per cent) say they are snacking more because they have less time.
  • Sixty-four per cent of Albertans look for wholesome food choices that are low in fat and calories.
  • Albertans were consistently the least likely to feel they get enough fibre (58 per cent), whole grains (50 per cent), and omega-3 (35 per cent).

Atlantic Provinces (Nfld., N.B., N.S., P.E.I.)

  • Three quarters of Atlantic Canadians (75 per cent) try to select snacks that have multiple nutritional benefits.
  • Ninety per cent of Atlantic Canadians believe taste is important in selecting a snack; just less than half (43 per cent) of Atlantic Canadians think snack foods can never be both tasty and healthy.
  • Two thirds of Atlantic Canadians
  • (63 per cent) agree they look for wholesome food choices that are low in fat
  • and calories.
  • Seven in 10 Atlantic Canadians (68 per cent) feel nutritious snacks are too
  • expensive.

British Columbia

  • Seven in 10 British Columbians (71 per cent) try to select snacks that have multiple nutritional benefits.
  • Seventy-seven per cent of British
  • Columbians believe that snack foods are not a good source of nutrients.
  • Because they feel they have a shortage of time, 33 per cent of British Columbians feel they snack more.
  • Sixty-two per cent of British Columbians say they look for wholesome food choices that are low in fat and calories.

Ontario

  • Ninety-two per cent of Ontarians think taste is important in selecting a snack; 48 per cent think snack foods can never be both tasty and healthy.
  • Six in 10 Ontarians (61 per cent) try
  • to select snacks that have multiple nutritional benefits.
  • Four in 10 Ontarians (37 per cent) feel they don’t have time to ensure they’re
  • getting specific nutrients.

Quebec

  • Seventy-one per cent of Quebec’s population try to select snacks that have multiple nutritional benefits. Although 87 per cent of the residents of Quebec feel taste is an important factor in choosing a snack, less than half (42 per cent) of Quebecers agree that snack foods can be healthy or tasty but never both.
  • Two thirds of Quebecers (66 per cent) look for wholesome food choices that are low in fat and calories.
  • Just over half of residents of Quebec (52 per cent) think nutritious snacks are too expensive.

Saskatchewan and Manitoba

  • Over three quarters (77 per cent) of residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba try to select snacks that have multiple
  • nutritional benefits, the most of any
  • region.
  • Seven in 10 people in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (72 per cent) look for wholesome food choices that are low in fat
  • and calories.
  • Residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are the least likely in Canada to be sure if they are getting enough omega-3, with four in 10 (40 per cent) saying they “don’t know” if they are getting enough.
  • Seventy-one percent of people in Saskatchewan and Manitoba agree that nutritious snacks are too expensive.