Canadian Vending

Products Snacks
Remember the Cola Wars? Get ready for the Bottle Wars.


April 15, 2011
By Canadian Vending

Topics

Last month, PepsiCo Inc. unveiled a bottle made entirely of plant
material, which it says challenges the technology of competitor
Coca-Cola and reduces its potential carbon footprint.

Last month, PepsiCo Inc. unveiled a bottle made entirely of plant material, which it says challenges the technology of competitor Coca-Cola and reduces its potential carbon footprint.

The bottle is made from switch grass, pine bark, corn husks and other materials. Ultimately, Pepsi plans to also use orange peels, oat hulls, potato scraps and other leftovers from its food business.

The discovery potentially changes the industry standard for plastic packaging. Traditional plastic, called PET, is used in beverage bottles, food pouches, coatings and other common products.

Advertisment

PepsiCo says it is the world’s first bottle of a common type of plastic called PET made entirely of plant-based materials. Coca-Cola Co. currently produces a bottle using 30 per cent plant-based materials and recently estimated it would be several years before it has a 100 per cent plant bottle that’s commercially viable.

PepsiCo plans to test the product in 2012 in a few hundred thousand bottles. Once the company is sure it can successfully produce the bottle at that scale, it will begin converting all its products over.

Meanwhile, in April Coca-Cola unveiled its new plan, announcing that all Dasani bottles and Odwalla single-serving bottles will be available exclusively using PlantBottle packaging. The single-serve Odwalla packages are made from up to 100 per cent plant-based materials with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic.  PET bottles for Dasani are made with up to 30 per cent plant-based materials.

The Dasani PlantBottle is currently available throughout western Canada, and will expand across the rest of the country beginning in May.

In 2010, more than 2.5 billion PlantBottle packages were available across nine countries.  For 2011, that number is expected to double to more than five billion packages in more than 15 countries.

PlantBottle was first launched in Canada in 2009 as part of Coke’s sustainability plan for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games. The company says that to date, the packaging worldwide has eliminated the equivalent of 30,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide or 11 million litres of gasoline used to produce PET plastic bottles.

The technology has also been adopted by Heinz, which recently announced it will begin packaging its ketchup using that technology under license beginning this summer in the U.S.