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Tea Can Reduce Stroke Risk

Canada is an established tea-drinking country


May 1, 2009
By Canadin Vending Magazine

In fact, tea consumption is expected to jump 40 per cent by 2020, as
growing consumer interest in health and wellness has led to increasing
awareness of tea’s functional benefits. Study findings provide further
insight into the many health benefits of tea.

Canada is an established tea-drinking country that consumes over 9 billion cups of tea each year.

In fact, tea consumption is expected to jump 40 per cent by 2020, as growing consumer interest in health and wellness has led to increasing awareness of tea’s functional benefits. Study findings provide further insight into the many health benefits of tea.

Researchers have found that regardless of country of origin or type of tea consumed, the consumption of three cups of black or green tea per day is associated with an average 21 per cent lower risk of ischemic stroke compared to non tea drinkers.

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The meta-analysis pooled nine studies involving 4,378 stroke occurrences from 195,000 individuals. Data was drawn from six countries – China, Japan, Finland, the Netherlands, Australia and the US – with the main outcome of fatal or non-fatal stroke.

Dr. Lenore Arab, PhD, Professor, Department of Medicine and Dept of Biological Chemistry, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, who lead the research program explained, “This Meta analysis suggests that daily increase in consumption to three cups of tea per day could lower the risk of ischemic stroke by 21 per cent. These findings relate to black and green teas but not herbal teas.”

Stroke is the second most common cause of death globally, claiming 5.4 million lives per year. It is a major cause of disability and has a significant impact on quality of life. Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in Canada with more than 50,000 strokes occurring each year.

 “This new study provides further support that regular tea drinking may be one of the most actionable lifestyle changes a consumer can make to help maintain heart health,” says Douglas Balentine, Ph.D., Lipton Institute of Tea.