Canadian Vending

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Twits, Fans and Business


June 11, 2009
By Cam Wood


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June 11, 2009 – I’ll admit; technology for me is
both a fascination and a loathing. My generation is the one sandwiched
between “it ain’t like the old days” and “tweet my peeps and we’ll
virtual nosh at the Connectivity Café.”

June 11, 2009 – I’ll admit; technology for me is both a fascination and a loathing. My generation is the one sandwiched between “it ain’t like the old days” and “tweet my peeps and we’ll virtual nosh at the Connectivity Café.”

Earlier this week I immersed myself into the learning curve of social media. For someone who has spent a career dependent on the printed word, social media seems somewhat as a passing phase. First we had MySpace, then Facebook, followed by Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube (which I might add is a great place to see those old videos from bands of yours, as music stations no longer play music videos). Life with these has evolved into a series of accounts, personalities and passwords. True social time diminished as keyboarding increased.

The virulent nature of connectivity today is seen as a virtual thorn in the dumbing down of the profession. It is the medium that has seemingly removed due process, investigative diligence and turned everyone with a PDA into reporters.

However, it is also the point in societal separation between the ages. There is no denying the relevance of social media and technology in our culture. As I commented to a couple other attendees – whom were uninitiated to the mad world of urban downtowns – they only need look along the streets to see the impact. Today – like everyday – the great human mass moves along the concrete paths, collectively staring down at their thumbs in motion, as opposed to making eye contact with others of the species.

And as the workforce gets younger, it becomes only more prevalent that we can no longer look each other in the eye.

The impact of social media and technology cannot be decried any longer.

There remains an irony in how all of these virtual pieces lay within our needs in the business world to develop relationships with our fellow man and woman. Communication, be it as humans or plugged-in organisms, is still the foundation of a relationship. And a relationship is the foundation of business success – a transaction must occur for a sale to exist.

Social media may be anything but “social” in a traditional sense: but it has become a strong motivator in creating social environments to foster change. There is a strong collective out there that would lend itself to such issues as Fair Trade coffee, chocolate, or healthy vending.

If you are an operator with campus or high traffic areas … it may be time for you to become “linked in” with your clientele and “tweet” with them to initiate awareness, particularly on those days when restocking has occurred.

Cameron Wood aka BloggerBoy, OldFartWithaPen, and InnoculatedEditor  … semi-colon, right bracket