Canadian Vending

Features Associations Business
Vending feature reaches six million viewers


May 19, 2009
By Administrator

Topics

NEWS HIGHLIGHT

Vending feature reaches six million viewers

Vending, coffee service and food service management
professionals who missed the recent feature on our industry that aired
on CBS Sunday Morning can now watch it on YouTube.

May 19, 2009 – Vending, coffee service and food service management professionals who missed the recent feature on our industry that aired on CBS Sunday Morning can now watch it on YouTube, (NAMA) executive vice-president and COO Dan Mathews, NCE recently announced.

“The CBS feature was exceptional because it communicated a positive message about our industry to millions of viewers across the country.  And now anyone can watch it just by visiting www.vending.org , and clicking on YouTube,” said Mathews.

The clip posted on YouTube is the 6.5 minute story that was produced by the network after a crew from the show visited the Spring Expo.  According to the Cision News monitoring company, the publicity value associated with the program is $600,000 per minute, which translates to about $3.3 million worth of positive coverage.  In addition, the CBS story has led to an upcoming vending feature planned to air on The View, a highly popular weekday program that reaches 3 million households and translates into a publicity value of $318,630 per minute.

Advertisment

“Features such as this one on CBS typically focus on some of the more unusual machines rather than the traditional food and beverage machines that most of us recognize as the core of our industry.  Producers at programs like this one, however, are more interested in creating an entertaining experience, which is why the hot dog and pizza machines usually get so much coverage.  But even though segments like this one don’t highlight the backbone of our industry, this type of coverage is still powerful because it gives us an opportunity to include other positive messages about vending in the story.  Without novel machines like these, most producers would conclude that there is no reason to produce a story about vending at all.”

Mathews also explained that unlike paid advertising, features such as the CBS story are free, but are planned exclusively based on the vision the producer has for the program.  This vision, combined with time restraints associated with TV, frequently results in what members of our industry see as the most important aspects of the story ending up on the cutting room floor instead of highlighted in the segment.  And while members may be disappointed not to see their favorite clip in the program, they should know that the only way to guarantee that a particular point is included in the story is to buy an advertisement.  In this case, purchasing an ad would have cost the industry an estimated $600,000 per minute.

“We hope our members recognize the phenomenal progress we have made changing the way people view our industry, which in the end helps increase sales and profits for us all.  The national television exposure that vending is receiving is unprecedented and reaches millions of consumers who can be persuaded to think better about vending and actually be excited to see what they can buy from their local vending machine,”  concluded Mathews.

NAMA is the national trade association of the food and refreshment vending, coffee service and foodservice management industries including on-site, commissary, catering, & mobile. Its membership is comprised of service companies, equipment manufacturers and suppliers of products and services to operating service companies.  The basic mission of the association, to collectively advance and promote the automatic merchandising and coffee service industries, still guides NAMA today as it did in 1936, the year of the organization’s founding.