Canadian Vending

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Vending machine gives context to hunger among youth


December 13, 2012
By Marketwire

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Dec. 13, 2012, Toronto – The Salvation Army has partnered with the Centre for Creative
Communications at Centennial College in Toronto to place a one-of-a-kind vending
machine on campus stocked with synthetic food waste.

Dec. 13, 2012, Toronto – The Salvation Army has partnered with the Centre for Creative
Communications at Centennial College in Toronto to place a one-of-a-kind vending
machine on campus stocked with synthetic food waste.

The machine is part of GREY Canada's effort to raise awareness for the millions of Canadians
currently living in poverty.

"While most vending machines are filled with tempting treats
like chips, candy and chocolate bars, this machine houses synthetic
waste, including moldy foods, rotting fruit and half-eaten snacks, to
disrupt everyday notions of choice and availability," said Stephanie
Nerlich, president of GREY Canada. "The vending machine reminds passersby
that although no one chooses to eat garbage, it's an everyday reality for many Canadians."

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Synthetic food waste is not dispensed from the machine, but
staff and students have the option to donate money to The Salvation Army
using the vending machine's coin slot. The ultimate goal is to raise
awareness that many Canadians go hungry and are reduced to eating waste.
A donation to the Salvation Army helps provide healthy meals to those
who need it most.

"The Salvation Army's vending machine really asks students to
consider how it feels when the freedom to choose what they eat is
removed," said Nate Horowitz, dean, Centre for Creative Communications
at Centennial College. "It's an important message to relay, especially
during the holiday season."